Marshall: 2018 Farm Bill should provide certainty to ag producers Featured

The current Farm Bill expires in September. Lawmakers in the US House and Senate are working on a five-year bill to replace the current legislation. The current Farm Bill expires in September. Lawmakers in the US House and Senate are working on a five-year bill to replace the current legislation. Kansas State Research and Extension photo.

Kansas Congressman Roger Marshall says work on a new Farm Bill continues in Congress.


A proposed Farm Bill hit the House floor last week. Marshall says he's working with different agricultural interests across the country to develop ag policy that benefits Kansas as a whole and the Flint Hills specifically.

The Farm Bill is important because it sets policy for crop insurance, disaster assistance, energy provisions, taxes, international aid and conservation. Marshall says crop insurance is a vital part of the upcoming Farm Bill, whether it's for companies or for individual ag producers, and he says the current drought bears out the need for certainty when the five-year Farm Bill is eventually passed.

Debate now shifts to the Senate Committee on Agriculture, and there are concerns about the current House proposal. Various ag groups have expressed concerns about Price Loss Coverage prices, working lands conservation programs, a $112 billion lower baseline from the Congressional Budget Office and baseline funding specifically for specialty crop programs.

The current Farm Bill expires in September.

Rate this item
(0 votes)
Last modified on Tuesday, 24 April 2018 10:17