December 3, 2014

Something to Think About
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The following are exerts from an editorial printed in the Gazette on Monday that was written by the Hutchinson News. I’m thinking it indicates why the proposed Keystone Pipeline proposal is so confusing.

From the HutchinsonNews: “When Congress — not if — sends the president a bill authorizing the Keystone XL oil pipeline, he ought to sign it contingent on approval by the legislatures in the states affected. The fixation on this pipeline has become irrational, and it shouldn’t be decided by irrational politicians.

The reality is both the concerns against and the benefits touted about the pipeline are exaggerated. The jobs would be temporary, so the economic benefit is grossly overpromoted. It isn’t about gas prices, which already are low and falling. At the same time, the environmental concerns seem hollow. Canada already is mining the oil, and the U.S. State Department has concluded the risk of an oil spill is slight.

First of all, know that two-thirds of the pipeline already is completed. It already carries crude from the oil sand fields in Canada into Oklahoma, where it can get to the Gulf of Mexico. The proposed XL portion provides for a couple of additions to the network.

Consequently, it seems like the proverbial horse is already out of the barn, so why such a fight is being waged at the federal level is puzzling. But that’s politics.

The Keystone XL project on Tuesday fell a single vote short of proceeding in the Senate. Doesn’t matter. It will be approved once Republicans take control of the Senate in January.

The debate over the Keystone XL shouldn’t be in Washington but at the state level.

And finally the Hutch News says: “The debate is done for Kansas, where the pipeline already has been built.

Kansas landowners and county governments got ignored when TransCanada built the 210-mile pipeline through six counties. Those counties lost about $8.5 million a year on the deal. That while being tasked with providing fire and emergency service in the event of a pipeline explosion or other accident.”

They concluded “It isn’t fair for politicians to cast away the interests of the local citizens who will live with the pipeline for their own political gain.”

Wow! Let’s see – jobs being overstated; gas prices already falling, so need is not so great; the threat of an oil spill is overrated; the Keystone Pipeline is already 2/3 built and won’t build anymore in Kansas; but six Kansas counties are losers already and could lose more; and yet our elected people still support this project.

            Help me – am I missing something?

I’m Steve Sauder and there’s something to think about.

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